May 22, 2018

Study Finds That Women are Angrier Behind the Wheel and Empty Roads Make 84 Percent of Drivers Happy

You’re on your way out of town for the holiday weekend, but 100 miles into your trip you’re stuck behind inconsiderate prick who is riding side-by-side with a Semi on a two-lane highway doing 10 mph under the limit. You honk your horn casually in an attempt to motivate them, but your only reply is a middle finger and a quick brake check. Talk about rude! Well, believe it or not, that inconsiderate prick is more likely to be a woman than a man. While it might not make sense, because women are made from sugar and spice and everything nice, a recent U.K. study has shown that women are actually 12-percent angrier than men when they’re behind the wheel. That’s right; a woman is more likely to lose it when driving than a man.

The study was commissioned by UK and conducted by Patrick Fagan – a behavioral psychologist at Goldsmiths University London. The main purpose was to “sense test” licensed drivers to see how different things like sound, sight, and smell lead to emotional responses in various driving scenarios. A total of 1,000 licensed drivers were tested, and the results are actually pretty surprising. As already mentioned women are 12-percent angrier when behind the wheel, 14-percent angrier when dealing with a backseat driver (most likely a man,) and 13-percent angrier when forced to deal with another driver who neglects to use their turn signals before changing lanes or turning. That’s just one part of the study, however, and it’s not all bad for women.

Explaining the overall results of the study, Patrick Fagan said, “Psychologically, women score higher than men on emotional and verbal intelligence, and on the personality trait of neuroticism. Evolutionary theory suggests our early female ancestors had to develop an acute sense of danger for anything that threatened them and their young if their cave was undefended while men were out hunting. That ‘early warning system’ instinct is still relevant today, and women drivers tend to be more sensitive to negative stimuli, so get angry and frustrated quicker. “

After that explanation, it does make sense, but anger levels aren’t all that the study has shown us. There are actually two dominate emotions linked to driving. One is, as we’ve already discussed, anger while the other is actually happiness – two ends of the same spectrum. The primary fuel behind happiness behind the wheel was found to be derived from the sense of freedom felt when driving. Next in line that contributes to happiness in 19 percent of drivers is the sense of mobility, and finally, 10 percent of drivers are happy just because of the independence associated with driving yourself around.

Keep reading for the rest of the story


Study Finds That Women are Angrier Behind the Wheel and Empty Roads Make 84 Percent of Drivers Happy

You’re on your way out of town for the holiday weekend, but 100 miles into your trip you’re stuck behind inconsiderate prick who is riding side-by-side with a Semi on a two-lane highway doing 10 mph under the limit. You honk your horn casually in an attempt to motivate them, but your only reply is a middle finger and a quick brake check. Talk about rude! Well, believe it or not, that inconsiderate prick is more likely to be a woman than a man. While it might not make sense, because women are made from sugar and spice and everything nice, a recent U.K. study has shown that women are actually 12-percent angrier than men when they’re behind the wheel. That’s right; a woman is more likely to lose it when driving than a man.

The study was commissioned by UK and conducted by Patrick Fagan – a behavioral psychologist at Goldsmiths University London. The main purpose was to “sense test” licensed drivers to see how different things like sound, sight, and smell lead to emotional responses in various driving scenarios. A total of 1,000 licensed drivers were tested, and the results are actually pretty surprising. As already mentioned women are 12-percent angrier when behind the wheel, 14-percent angrier when dealing with a backseat driver (most likely a man,) and 13-percent angrier when forced to deal with another driver who neglects to use their turn signals before changing lanes or turning. That’s just one part of the study, however, and it’s not all bad for women.

Explaining the overall results of the study, Patrick Fagan said, “Psychologically, women score higher than men on emotional and verbal intelligence, and on the personality trait of neuroticism. Evolutionary theory suggests our early female ancestors had to develop an acute sense of danger for anything that threatened them and their young if their cave was undefended while men were out hunting. That ‘early warning system’ instinct is still relevant today, and women drivers tend to be more sensitive to negative stimuli, so get angry and frustrated quicker. “

After that explanation, it does make sense, but anger levels aren’t all that the study has shown us. There are actually two dominate emotions linked to driving. One is, as we’ve already discussed, anger while the other is actually happiness – two ends of the same spectrum. The primary fuel behind happiness behind the wheel was found to be derived from the sense of freedom felt when driving. Next in line that contributes to happiness in 19 percent of drivers is the sense of mobility, and finally, 10 percent of drivers are happy just because of the independence associated with driving yourself around.

Keep reading for the rest of the story


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Study Finds That Women are Angrier Behind the Wheel and Empty Roads Make 84 Percent of Drivers Happy

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